Canceled TV Shows

Geeks will watch just about anything if it’s on television, no matter how awful it may be. And they’ll happily buy whatever merchandise for the show you’d like to sell, they’ll happily quote lines from it, they’ll call it “the best show on television” and they’ll happily write fan fiction about it. But if you really want them to show their interest in and devotion to a show, all you have to do is cancel it. That’s when the geek truly shines.

Sure, they’ll moan and complain and create petitions and mail food to TV companies, but deep in their hearts they are delighted and proud that their beloved show is canceled. This is because geek programs are only canceled for one reason: they were too good for TV. Having his show be canceled validates the geek’s idea that his tastes are far above that of the ignorant, sheep-like masses.

Having a show canceled also has another upside for the geek. If it’s no longer in production, all those meddling writers, producers, actors, and studios can’t “mess it up” for him by having things happen on the show that blatantly contradict the obvious “right way” things would happen, were the geek in charge. It saves him the later trouble of having to declare he’s going to boycott the show (he won’t) because someone on the show did something that was “totally out of character”. It puts the show into a little snowglobe the geek can cradle and protect from the cruel outside world. The geek and his friends now own and control it and it is finally where it belongs, in the hands of the “true fans”.

So there are two main reasons why geeks LOVE canceled TV shows.

5 Responses

  1. Oh my God, it’s TRUE!

  2. But the best shows on TV do get canceled all the time. And I am only a geek by marriage!

  3. […] iO9 isn’t doing enough by itself. Stuff Geeks Love. They’ve already covered stuff like canceled TV shows and zombies. So I agree with what they’ve written so […]

  4. […] argued before that although they will complain forever about the cancellation of a beloved TV show, nerds […]

  5. “Having a show canceled also has another upside for the geek. If it’s no longer in production, all those meddling writers, producers, actors, and studios can’t “mess it up” for him”

    the upside for the seriousl;y *completionist* geek is that if it’s no longer in production, all those writers, producers, actors, and studios can’t add more and more to it – possibly so much more that watching (and reading, if it’s got book and comic spinoffs) the *complete* thing would become difficult.

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